NETGEAR EXTENDER TECHNICAL SUPPORT

Netgear is an American global networking company, which makes networking products for three major segments i.e. retail, commercial, and service provider. Netgear came into existence on 8th January 1996 and its primary focus was on providing networking solutions for small businesses and home users. On February 2002 Netgear became a fully independent company.

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How to Enable Flow Control on a Router

Not all routers allow you to configure flow control. In fact, most routers do not. Flow control is mainly a function of a network switch. However, some models of routers, like those with built-in switch capabilities (known also as a “smart switch”), will allow the user to set flow control for each port or device connected to the network. Linksys and Netgear both manufacture routers with the smart switch capabilities.

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How to Set the MTU to Auto in Comcast

Like most cable providers, Comcast uses an MTU size of 1500 bytes. Generally, the network devices provided by Comcast already have the optimal value of 1500 configured. However, some of their devices allow you to specify a manual or automatic configuration. In most cases, you should leave the MTU at the original value for optimal performance. If a circumstance arises requiring you to troubleshoot or change the MTU, you can change it to use automatic negotiation. This would let your device automatically detect and set your MTU value. This setting is found within their user interface, which is accessible using a Web browser.

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Wireless Repeater Vs. Mesh Network

Wireless networks support the access required for most computer devices, particularly handheld devices such as mobile phones and portable-computing devices such as netbooks and laptops. The signal from a wireless network is crucial to the functioning of these devices, determining how a device accesses the Internet. There are two ways of addressing signal strength in a network. They seem similar, but work in different circumstances and produce different results. They are wireless repeaters and wireless mesh networks.

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Netgear As a Wireless Extender

A wireless extender, or repeater, strengthens a router’s wireless signal and extends coverage, improving performance and enabling devices from a distance to detect and connect to the network. Depending on the model, you can set up your Netgear router to act as a wireless extender and connect it to the main router, or base station, hosting the primary network. Before you can configure the router as a repeater, you must configure the base station to recognize the wireless extender.

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Disable DMZ Configuration

A router uses a firewall to refuse unauthorized traffic entering the local area network, but administrators can set up a demilitarized zone, or DMZ, and instruct the networking device to send the traffic to a single computer on the network, effectively putting it “outside” of the firewall. This can be a workaround for some problems, but also means that the computer in the DMZ is more susceptible to attack. To put the computer back behind your firewall and keep your machines secure, disable the DMZ setting on the router.

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Set Up Security with Microsoft Broadband Management Tools

Microsoft Broadband Wireless base stations feature a Web-based management tool you can access to password-protect the network. The management tool supports Wired Equivalent Privacy and Wi-Fi Protected Access, two different security protocols used to defend networks from intruders. WPA improves upon WEP and uses encryption to secure data transferred over the network so only the sender and the recipient can interpret the information. For the best protection, you should set the base station to use WPA. The device settings can be changed from your browser.

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Setup Cricket Broadband With Wireless Router

With a Cricket Broadband modem, you can access Cricket’s 3G cellular data service from your computer, just as if you were using a smartphone. If you want to then share this 3G connection with multiple devices, you need to set up a wireless router. As of May 2013, Cricket Broadband is only compatible with one wireless router: the Cricket Crosswave. With the Crosswave installed, you can share your Cricket Broadband Internet connection with up to four devices simultaneously.

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Set Up Google DNS on a Router

Google’s pubic DNS servers are an alternative to those provided by your ISP, which may be out of date and cause some websites not to work when you try to access them. Normally, you can change DNS server settings for your computer, but this won’t affect other machines on your network. Routers like those from Netgear, LinkSys and Belkin allow you to use custom DNS servers from any device connected to the network, however. When done correctly, the process is seamless and you shouldn’t notice any difference in the way that your devices connect to the Internet.

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How to Change the MTU on a Netgear Genie

The Maximum Transmission Unit, or “MTU,” can be specified on most routers, including the Netgear Genie App. The MTU specifies the largest packet size that can be transmitted over the network. The default router setting for the MTU is 1500 bytes for Ethernet networks, and 1492 for PPPoE connections. However, your ISP may require a lower setting to accommodate connectivity and the flow of data.

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Should You Set Your Router to a Different Channel or Keep It on Auto?

Wireless routers send and receive data using a radio signal. In order to avoid interference with other routers, cordless phones and other radio devices, routers can transmit on several different channels. Some routers also have an “auto” channel feature, which selects the least-crowded channel to use. If your network works properly on the auto setting, there is no need to change it. If you occasionally lose your connection, you can try different channels manually.

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Block Anonymous Users From Sharing the Internet Through the Router

Protecting your router from unauthorized access is essential. Nefarious anonymous users that connect to your router not only consume the bandwidth that you purchase, but these individuals can implicate you in crimes by using your Internet connection for illegal activity. An open network also compromises your personal data when you bank or shop online. You can block anonymous users from sharing your Internet connection by configuring security and changing a few settings on your router.

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Find Your IP Address, Primary DNS & Default Router

Identifying your IP address, primary DNS and the address for your default router can help you troubleshoot problems with your network connection. Without an IP address, you can’t connect to websites on the Internet, while Domain Name Systems translate the domain names you enter into your address bar into a purely numerical address. Usually, your Internet Service Provider assigns the DNS server for your devices. The default router address, also known as a default gateway, is the direct address that you can enter into your Web browser to access the configuration utility for your router.

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How To Increase The Speed of Your Router

Whether you’re setting up a new router or looking to get the best speeds from an old one, it’s important to understand which settings have an impact on network traffic speeds. When you’re configuring your router, it’s also important to know which types of traffic should get priority over others. For example, you can set up most routers to give priority to video and audio so your video conference calls aren’t bogged down by someone else in the office who is downloading a software update at the same time.

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Router Settings to Increase Speed

Introducing techniques to address network performance not only improves end user satisfaction, but it is also an attractive alternative to increasing bandwidth and cost. While wide area network bandwidth is often the focus of attention when companies are looking to improve network speed, it is a good idea to investigate improvements through router settings first. Settings to consider include compression and caching features.

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Find Your SSID Password

The Service Set Identifier, also known as the SSID, is the name assigned to your wireless network on your router. If the SSID is configured to broadcast, the SSID displays in the “Available Wireless Networks” list when a device scans for wireless networks in range. If the Wi-Fi network is secured with WEP or WPA/WPA2 encryption, the SSID password is required to connect to the network. Log in as an administrator to your router’s management tool to find your wireless network SSID password.

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Unable To Login To Netgear Router

An inability to access your Netgear device’s menu could leave you unable to alter your network’s settings, and may indicate a problem with your Internet connection. The Netgear menu governs key security and wireless settings on your network, and it is important that you are able to access it if needed. Knowing how to troubleshoot a menu access problem will help you to keep your network secure and minimize downtime.

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How to See the Ports That Are Blocked on a Router

You can block or allow specific services through ports using your router’s management tool. Viewing a list of ports that are blocked on the router involves logging in to the device’s administrative interface and examining the firewall rules, port forwarding rules and filters configured on the router. Each router manufacturer’s management tool is different, so the procedure for viewing a list of all blocked ports varies significantly between router interfaces.

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Data Transfer Speed for Router

The data transfer speeds you can expect from your router are largely dictated by the type of connection running between it and your computer. Both Ethernet and Wi-Fi comprise a range of data transfer standards, meaning that two similar-looking routers may transfer at markedly different speeds. In addition, speed differences between LAN and WAN technologies may result in internal traffic running faster than Internet traffic from the same device.

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How to Find Your Router’s IP on a Mac

Without a working connection to a router, your computer would be unable to send or receive Internet data. Computers send traffic that is destined for other networks to their local router, which then forwards it on to the correct destination. For this process to take place, the computer needs to know the correct IP address for the router. Apple’s Mac OS X operating system allows you to verify key network settings, including the local router’s IP address, through the System Preferences menu.

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Virtual Routing & Forwarding and How Is it Configured?

Virtual Routing and Forwarding allows you to use multiple routing tables on one router. The practice can bring both security and efficiency benefits, allowing you to run multiple logical networks with entirely separate address spaces without having to purchase additional network equipment. VRF is often used by Internet Service Providers, as it allows them to provide multiple private networks to clients from one set of hardware.

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Why Does My Router Keep Losing the Internet Connection on the Secondary Computer?

If just one of the computers on your network keeps losing its connection, you can be reasonably sure that the problem lies with that device, rather than your network hardware. Common causes of single-computer connection errors include wireless adapter driver problems and incorrect security settings. However, your secondary computer’s physical location can also have an impact on its connection to your router, especially over wireless networks.

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